Six Months, Three Days: Cuento corto.

full_andersweber_6monthsSix Months, Three Days es una novela corta de género romántico – ciencia ficción escrita por Charlie Jane Anders, publicada en la página Tor.com en Junio 2011 y galardonada con el premio Hugo en 2012 por mejor Novela corta.

Ésta historia combina atractivas temáticas como viajes en el tiempo, clarividencia, realidades alternas, entre otras. Podría decirse que es una mezcla entre las premisas de Mr. Nobody y The Time Traveler’s Wife.

Sin ganas de arruinar la experiencia de futuros lectores, les invito a leer la historia de Judy y Doug, y a sumergirse en su interesante desarrollo. El cuento está en idioma inglés, disponible en el primer enlace de éste escrito. Go ahead and enjoy it!

Anuncios

Actriz Krysten Ritter Publicará Primera Novela “Bonfire”

Constant Motions

Krysten Ritter es una actriz bastante conocida dentro de la actual cultura pop dada su amplia gama de roles, principalmente en la pantalla chica, destacándose su estelar papel en la serie de Marvel Jessica Jones y su rol como Jane Margolis en Breaking Bad; sin embargo, de una manera u otra, Krysten ha estado en nuestros radares por varios años, en mi caso la recuerdo como Lucy en Gilmore Girls (2006-2007) y quizás otros la recuerdan como Gia en Veronica Mars (2005-2006).

16124044_243067292811083_258387418665713664_n1

La realidad es que Ritter cuenta con una interesantísima batería de facetas, por ejemplo es tejedora profesional y le encanta restregar en nuestras pantallas sus perfectas puntadas cada vez que tiene oportunidad a través de su Instagram… Okay okay, esto es solo parcialmente cierto, pero lo que es completamente cierto es que es cantante principal de la banda musical indie Ex Vivian lanzando un álbum…

Ver la entrada original 358 palabras más

Review of Netflix Original series LOVE.

Like Jimmy Fallon’s Random Picture Word Association game where you have to react with the first word that pops into your head in relation to a picture, since I ran into Love being available in Netflix, my mind screamed ANNIE HALL. Sometimes when I get those associations I immediately look around to see if anyone thought the same -humans, they sometimes seek corroboration on their thoughts-, but on this I couldn’t find anything.

It is not just the dorky male main character and the cooler female lead, it was more than those first obvious similarities, it was the vibe that got me to compare. Two human beings connecting on an interesting way and trying to figure out love, its meaning and its many ways. I believe that’s where the series is going, even if they couldn’t quite capture it in a ten episodes season as the one hour thirty three minutes of the movie did. But they could get there, there’s another season on the way.

love-poster

The Original Netflix series was launched on our current 2016 under the creative mantle of Judd Apatow, Lesley Arfin and Paul Rust (who also plays Gus). We know Apatow from his involvement in the production of multiple movies and TV shows (which you can find on the info linked to his name), say some of my personal favourites are Girls on HBO and Begin Again (2013), movie that I reviewed on this same blog, but heads up it’s all in spanish.

When it comes to the cast, let’s say that I see these unconventional characters clashing together and I really liked the result. Gillian Jacobs is a must love, having lots of facets to choose from, we can go from the freakishly nice person she played as Mimi-Rose in Girls, up to the complicated addict, sort of jerky trying to improve girl that we see along these episodes as Mickey Dobbs. Paul Rust is as well an instant charm who I just have known as Denis Cooverman in I Love You, Beth Cooper but was pleased to see again on this show as the sweet nerdy guy who just had his heart broken and is trying to figure out his next step, named Gus Cruikshank. And even Charlyne Yi, who I found utterly and completely annoying on House MD -in a lovely way, of course- has a presence on the show, to add a bit of IT to the parade. For the complete cast list, just hit it here.

Alongside the lines, we are signing to see a symposium on love that comes non-lineal, non-boring, not directed to a room full of people expecting to hear about it, it is just what you take of it and again, reminded me of Annie Hall, just that in the latter everything is more explicit and you got the sense that you’re being taught a thing or two.

Love truly is a roller coaster.

I have a soft spot for these kind of material, from where you can extract basically whatever you want, it all depends on you and your points of view. This show could end up being another romantic/comedy/drama that gets tiring after a few episodes or it can live up to its true potential through the eyes of the viewers and the meaning they are able to extract from it all.

Already expecting Season 2 and in the mean time will probably watch Season 1 again, not because it was such mind blowing but because that is what good friends and partners often have to do for their love ones. We’ve all been there.

So, this was just a reduced review mostly wanting to throw into the net the idea of similarities between these two pieces of filmed entertainment.

 

Book Review: A Man called Ove.

a-man-called-ove-by-fredrik-backmanGetting old provokes a mixture of feelings, some look forward to a long life while some others fear what might happen to them as time progresses. The truth is time never stops, at least not objectively; and times are always changing, leaving behind everything and everyone which or who refuses to cope — oh, hello Darwin’s natural selection. Could this be the real reason why we develop relationships? why we come together as groups, couples or friends? To have someone to grow old with, to have witnesses, a thread to the world, connections to reality, to avoid being left behind, feeling left out of the race…

What happens when we lose all of that and end up alone with ourselves? We would say that we still have ourselves and our skills, but what about when this happens at an age where we are also being displaced from a productive working life, when society finds us obsolete, where ways narrow and doors close? This is where we find Ove.

Ove is a tough old man that has been brought up with strong values, believing in fairness, in the clearness and weight of actions over words. To him things should be done in a certain way and as this allows little space to flexibility, ends up putting to the test the patience of others that surround him.

To have your life resumed on paper could be difficult, all of your struggles and hard moments, surfacing to those shallow waters of memory’s deep sea. Sounds smart to be avoided and yet memoirs are so popular nowadays. Let’s say that Ove didn’t sign up for this but we have been given a ticket to sit through glimpses of his life, those that defined his character, to better understands how a person becomes what a person presently is.

As it is common in life, plans change course most of the time, as ships thrown into stormy waters. So, as non-oficial guardian of his neighbourhood, Ove sets himself to keep busy with his customary tasks and making sure everyone follows the rules. Nonetheless some days these little things become minimally fulfilling and Ove, as a practical man, has his mind set on his next logical step.

If we think about it, the relationships that are most meaningful for us today surely started in a peculiar way, by chance, creating havoc inside our little closed worlds, marking us forever. To Ove was a turmoil indeed to have new neighbours moving in the house in front of his, mostly in moments he most wanted to be left alone with his business.

From that moment on we will meet a display of characters that soon invade Ove’s reduced bubble, allowing us to meet him not all over again, but then again not as a loner and inside himself, and more as the caring and sweet being we knew was in there all along protecting itself from a cruel environment.

f5dcc2be-a1ab-47cf-bf1b-2f9072d649d7.jpg

Fredrik Backman delivers a well elaborated story that gives us lots to think about, mostly on regards of the ways of our current society. A Man Called Ove was published in 2012, originally in Sweden, was -to our delight- translated to English around 2014 by Henning Koch and published by Atria Books with an approximate of 337 pages on his paperback presentation.

I personally listened to this story on Audible, narrated by George Newbern, with a duration of 9 hours and 9 minutes. This is one of those books that I have listed “have to own”, so I will be buying it soon and giving it a home on my bookshelf.

Reseña del Libro: The Little Prince.

The Little Prince además de ser mi libro leído más corto del año 2015, fue el más popular según mi reporte anual de Goodreads, y sin duda alguna ya que es un clásico que continua rompiendo las barreras del tiempo.

Escrita por Antoine de Saint-Exupéry  y publicada por primera vez en el año 1943 en New York, es una historia para niños que apela fuertemente al entendimiento de los adultos.img_20151231_165050.jpg

Mientras leía, me propuse marcar aquellas líneas que me parecieran cargadas de alguna enseñanza, pero terminé tomando notas de las páginas ya que iba a terminar llenando el libro de post-its. No es del todo sencillo intentar plasmar las enseñanzas de manera cruda, pero me nace intentarlo. No estoy segura si podrían considerarse spoilers, pero con libros de esta magnitud, no es algo que me preocupe… soy una de esas pocas personas que aún no lo leía.

Desde la primera página nos muestra la infinita esencia de la imaginación y como poco a poco la vamos perdiendo si no somos cuidadosos. De la mano, nos plantea lo subjetivo del arte y nuestra incapacidad de ser tolerantes con las idea externas la mayor parte del tiempo, debido a lo difícil que es ver más allá de nuestras propias creencias.

Advierte a los pequeños de las diferentes maneras de juzgar que tienen los adultos, ejemplificando la importancia de la vestimenta ante los conocimientos. Pobre Astrónomo Turco, lo positivo es que no tuvo que rehacer toda su presentación, simplemente tuvo que cambiarse los vestidos para ganar validez.

“Here is my secret. It is quite simple: One sees clearly only with the heart. Anything essential is invisible to the eyes.”

Nos aconseja en pos de estudiarnos diariamente, detectar en nuestros caracteres esas pequeñas fallas que descuidadas se convierten en malos hábitos, capaces de arraigarse tanto hasta ser prácticamente imposibles de arrancar. Descuidados, esos malos hábitos -baobabs- pueden incluso llegar a destruir todo nuestro pequeño universo personal.

El hecho de comparar las rosas con las mujeres, pues admito que podría haberme causado incomodidad, pero dejo pasar debido a que la comparación engloba hermosos sentimientos e importantes realizaciones. El pequeño príncipe entiende durante su viaje que el universo está lleno de rosas, no solo una como él inicialmente creyó… sin embargo esa una es su rosa, la que lo ha acompañado, a la que ha cuidado, la que lo ha escogido… y son estas y tantas otras cosas la que la hacen única.

El príncipito se aventura en un viaje, principalmente para alejarse de aquella rosa que tanto termina anhelando, pero antes de todo, se encuentra con interesantes personajes que van enseñándole cosas positivas como negativas. No abundaré mucho 20151231_164743.jpgen todo esto, tengo que dejar espacio para que las páginas hablen por sí mismas.

“Then you shall pass judgement on yourself, that is the hardest thing of all. It is much harder to judge yourself than to judge others. If you succeed in judging yourself, it is because you are truly a wise a man.”

Pero no se queden con estas líneas que he escrito, encuentren la belleza de esta historia por ustedes mismos, si es que aún no lo han hecho. Personalmente voy a atesorar este libro y lo leeré a mis futuros pequeños, y si no a los míos, pues a los del vecino. Así las ansias de compartirlo.

Reseña de Libro: The Nightingale.

The Nightingale fue publicado en Enero del 2015, siendo la obra publicada número veintidós de la escritora Kristin Hannah y un éxito instantáneo dentro del mundo literario -qué decir dentro de mis lecturas de éste año- , encontrándose bajo mi género favorito: Ficción histórica. El libro cuenta con 438 páginas en su versión portada de papel, sin embargo yo lo disfruté en su versión de Audible, narrado en la voz de Polly Stone, con una duración de 17 horas y 26 minutos. Perfecto para cualquier conmutación.

Kristin Hannah nos entrega una historia simple y llana, que va llenándose de color a través de los personajes y sus acciones más que por los hechos. Son los personajes, sobre el escenario de la primera y segunda guerra mundial, el holocausto judío y otros sucesos históricos, que desarrollan una historia única, con nueva luz sobre el sufrimiento, la lucha por sobrevivir, la esperanza perdida y encontrada -¿y perdida una vez más?- y oportunidades que rozan en lo fantasioso y lo desafortunado.

Vianne e Isabelle son hermanas que crecen juntas pero en universos paralelos, su relación sesgada por su difícil condición de vida. Suele pasar, que ciertas situaciones separen la familia en vez de unirlas. Ambas jóvenes se enfrentan a sus separados mundos, enfrentando mismas situaciones desde diferentes puntos de vista, actuando desde sus arraigadas formas de ser. No es hasta que estos mundos se encuentran en la misma órbita y no hay más opción que destapar viejas cajas de lombrices, que conocemos más a fondo a nuestros personajes principales y aquellas cicatrices que aún no sanan por completo.

No es una historia de héroes y heroínas, es más que nada una que nos muestra los cambios y distancias que se están dispuestos a cubrir cuando se trata de supervivencia, cuando se quiere hacer lo correcto en situaciones difíciles. No es un libro mas sobre la dura vida en los tiempos de guerra, es uno único y repleto de magnificas piezas, que logrará tocarnos el alma y dejarnos anonadados; es una obra para disfrutarla. Este es mi primer libro de K. Hannah y sin duda me ha animado a conocer más sobre la autora.

Reseña de Película: Detachment.

¿Alguna vez te has puesto o pusiste en el lugar de tus profesores? Recuerdo que fue inevitable no hacerlo durante mis años de colegio, cada vez que alguno de mis compañeros mostraba cierto grado de irrespeto, cada vez que algún profesor no era capaz de conectar con los alumnos, cada vez que alguno tomaba la vía más sencilla y desinteresada para llevar enseñanzas que no estaban siendo captadas. Detachment es una película estadounidense del 2011 que logra captar la esencia de lo que la sociedad espera de un educador en estos tiempos, expectativas que cada día acarrean menos sentido. Dirigida por Tony Kaye y escrita por Carl Lund, es un grito ante una situación que poco a poco se sale de control y parece situarse fuera del radar de situaciones a tomar en cuenta.

Henry Barthes es un profesor sustituto, a quien su posición temporal ha protegido de la dura tarea de responsabilizarse por un grupo de alumnos en específico, del hecho de tener que responder por su grado de aprendizaje y crecimiento en numerosos aspectos, no solo en el académico. Parecería un trabajo bastante pesado ser el padre de toda una clase, pero aparentemente se ha hecho parte del requisito que tiene un profesor dentro de nuestra sociedad moderna.

La presión que hoy recae sobre las escuelas de ser el fundamento educativo y formativo social de los adolescentes es increíblemente absurda. El hecho de que la mayoría de los padres hayan decidido hacerse la tarea más fácil y ponerlo todo en manos de otros es un serio problema que se ha estado reflejando en muchos de los jóvenes hoy en día. Me parece que el filme logra un trabajo increíble a la hora de transmitir este mensaje, experimentando desde los diferentes puntos de vista en relación al mismo. Expresando la posición de los maestros, la de los alumnos y así mismo la de los padres. Un trabajo bastante completo, que le permitió ganar varios premios dentro del mundo cinematográfico.

El cast se compone de una variada gama de actores, muy reconocidos como Adrien Brody, Marcia Gay Harden, Bryan Cranston, James Caan, Blythe Danner, Tim Blake Nelson, Christina Hendricks y Lucy Liu, y más jóvenes como Sami Gayle y Betty Kaye. Adrien Brody hace un grandioso trabajo (como en casi todos sus papeles) como Henry Barthes, quien además de su actuación, se presta para reflexiones durante el transcurso de la película.

Disfruté mucho del filme, tanto por su bien elaborada temática como por mi interés en este tipo de cuestiones sociales. La verdad es que tres años han simplemente agudizado nuestra noción del problema, que se hace cada vez más palpable.